Category: Projects

Digitraining: Open call for European cultural heritage institutions

DigiTraining, Digital & Audiovisual Capacity Building for Accessible Heritage, a project co-funded by the European Commission under the Creative Europe Programme, has launched an Open Call for European cultural heritage institutions.

The digital shift in the cultural heritage sector is important but can be quite challenging: successful applicants will receive training and support in the process to innovate and integrate new technologies in their organisations. For some this means personalised and
tailor-made support and digital production services directly adapted to their needs and mission to facilitate accessibility to culture.

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A Season of Classic Films: Discover Czech silent films

A Season of Classic Films at NFA

From April to June, the Czech National Film Archive will offer free online access to seven silent films with contemporary music, in the frame of ‘A Season of Classic Films’. The selection includes some of the first movies shot in the Czech lands, Karel Lamač’s films and performances by Vlasta Burian and Anna Ondráková. Some screenings will be followed by live discussion on topics related to silent film and its presentation.

The first screening of the Czech retrospective is Karel Lamač’s Bílý ráj (White Paradise, 1924, 73’) with music by multi-instrumentalist Tomáš Vtípil on Thursday 8 April, starting at 17:00 CET. In this film, Nina falls for the good heart and piercing eyes of an escaped prisoner and decides to help him visit his dying mother for the last time. An ingeniously written script and the involvement of ‘The Strong Four’ – one of the most distinctive creative teams to come out of Czechoslovak cinema: director and actor Karel Lamač, cameraman Otto Heller, actress Anny Ondra and screenwriter Václav Wasserman – contributed to the international success of the film and established Lamač and Ondra as major forces of early cinema. Other prominent figures of early Czech cinema participated in the production, such as Martin Frič and Gustav Machatý. The new film digitisation originates from a 35mm coloured restored print, for which a unique tinted and toned nitrate film provided source material.

FILM + MUSIC PERFORMANCE: WHITE PARADISE 

The premiere screening on 8 April will be followed by the discussion ‘Classics Today’, which provides a framework for the entire Czech retrospective. What the term ‘classic’ means in architecture, music, literature and why using this term, will be some of the questions discussed by guests from various cultural fields and moderated by the General Director of the Czech National Film Archive, Mihal Bregant.

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Questionnaire on future digital services for ACE members – Summary of results

In July 2020, ACE asked their membership to participate in a survey that would give insight into where ACE member archives currently publish their collections online, who they consider their main target audiences and what functionalities and services they find important in online platforms. The aim of the survey was to get a general sense of where ACE members generally stand with regard to their publication efforts and to find out what they would expect from a digital service, should ACE decide to offer one. This report summarizes the replies of 34 ACE archives that answered the survey.

Discover rare gems of Soviet and Russian cinema with Open Collection

The Russian Film Archive Gosfilmond and the portal Cultura.RU have announced the start of a joint project called Open Collection.  For this project, employees of the scientific department of the State Film will prepare more than 20 rare films for publication each month.

Elena Filatova, General Director of the State Film Fund of the Russian Federation, says that the Open Collection project will let audiences meet rare examples of Soviet and Russian cinema, many of which until recently could only be viewed by researchers until now.

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A Season of Classic Films: free worldwide screening of ‘Sanz and the secret of his art’

Sanz and the secret of his art, an unusual hybrid between documentary and fiction displaying animated human-like dolls, will be screened on Friday 5 February at 18:00 CET with live music, in the frame of the 2020-2021 edition of ‘A Season of Classic Films’.

The screening will be freely accessible worldwide with English subtitles via the YouTube channel of the Institut Valencià de Cultura, and at the same time a limited audience will have the opportunity to attend the event at the Filmoteca’s cinema in Valencia.

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A Season of Classic Films: online premiere with the newly restored ‘Sinner without a sin’

The second edition of A Season of Classic Films will premiere on Friday 4 December at 19:00 CET with a free online worldwide streaming of the newly restored 1930 film Sinner without a sin. Yugoslovenska Kinoteka will provide the streaming service via its YouTube channel, while the screening at its premises in Belgrade, Serbia, will take place at a later date based on the latest COVID-19 measures.

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A Season of Classic Films – Programme Catalogue

This publication presents the film titles selected for the second edition of A Season of Classic Films. It provides a colourful palette of European cinema history which aims to be a source of inspiration for cinemagoers and film programmers around the world. The films are presented by 22 members of the Association of European Cinematheques (Association des Cinémathèques Européennes – ACE).

The 22 partner institutions selected a total of over 50 short and long-feature films, showcasing distinguished titles and less known treasures. Most of the films are new digital restorations and some screenings include exciting elements such as live performances and experimental electronic music.

 

Download: A Season of Classic Films – programme catalogue

 

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The new Season of Classic Films to be presented at Festival Lumière

After the success in 2019 with more than 15.000 people participating, ‘A Season of Classic Films’ is back for its second edition in December.

Led this year by the Association des Cinémathèques Européennes (ACE) with the funding of the European Commission under the cross-sectoral strand of Creative Europe programme, this initiative will be presented on 15 October at the Festival Lumière in Lyon. The festival, focusing on the history of cinema, will host a special afternoon around ‘Europe and Heritage’ where Sandra den Hamer, ACE president and Eye Filmmuseum director, and Maria Silvia Gatta, representative from the European Commission DG CNECT, will explain the details of the outreach project and other policies and trends to keep supporting and modernising European film heritage.

The second edition of the Season of Classic Films will consist of a series of free screenings planned between December 2020 and June 2021 across Europe to raise awareness of the work of European national and regional film archives, especially among young adults. Most of the films are new digital restorations and some screenings include exciting elements such as live performances and experimental electronic music. With 22 participating institutions, this initiative particularly aims to support the reopening of European film archives, all affected by the Covid19 crisis.

A map including the list of cities and films will be soon available via this page.

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‘A Season of Classic Films’ to be presented on Monday 31 August at Il Cinema Ritrovato


Gian Luca Farinelli, on behalf of Sandra Den Hamer (ACE’s President), will announce on Monday the Season of Classic Films initiative at Il Cinema Ritrovato festival.

This will happen during the conversation between Thierry Frémaux and Gian Luca Farinelli on Monday 31st at twelve o’clock at Cinema Lumiere (Sala Officinema/Mastroianni). At the end of the conversation Gian Luca Farinelli will present the trailer of the project.

It’s possible to follow the event online on the Festival’s streaming website:
https://www.mymovies.it/ondemand/cinema-ritrovato/

and also on ACE’s FB page:
https://www.facebook.com/AssociationdesCinemathequesEuropeennes/

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The Brilliant Biograph: Earliest Moving Images of Europe (1897-1902)

Eye Filmmuseum and the British Film Institute present a compilation film of newly-restored rare images from the first years of filmmaking. Immerse yourself in enchanting images of Venice, Berlin, Amsterdam and London from 120 years ago. Let yourself be carried away in the mesmerizing events and celebrities of the time, and feel the enthusiasm of early cinema that overcame the challenge of capturing life-like movement.

 

Origins

The Mutoscope and Biograph Company was founded by film pioneer and inventor William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson, who had worked with Thomas Edison since the 1880s. After leaving Edison, Dickson and partners filmed remarkable events across Europe.

These films are all photographed with the unique large-format 68mm Mutograph camera, which provided extraordinarily high resolution images. These one-minute time capsules from 120 years ago still convey some of the richest and sharpest images that film can achieve.

The films reflect the essence of early cinema: capturing the first ever moving images of important events, famous locations and personalities, as well as spectacular moments such as dance and sports performances, or even natural phenomena like fire or storm, that only work when seen in motion.

 

The Collection and Restoration

The Mutoscope and Biograph Collection is the oldest film collection held at Eye Filmmuseum. It includes over 200 films, most of which made in Europe between 1897 and 1902. This constitutes the largest existing collection of Mutoscope and Biograph films surviving in the world.

The films are shot on nitrate film stock with a short-lived technology which was, at the time, innovative and groundbreaking: an exceptionally large-format film (approx. 68mm wide, without perforation) with an extremely high resolution providing extraordinary richness of details.

Because the films are a non-standard size, they have been largely unseen. Given their obsolete format digital restoration with custom-made equipment at a resolution of around 8K is the best way to make them accessible again, using today’s technology. After digitization, image restoration is done to reproduce as closely as possible the characteristics of the original film.

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